All posts tagged: brazilianfood

Tomorrow’s Museum Today

Rio’s centre is filled with both modern and historical gems to discover, and a very new one is Museu do Amanhã – the Museum of Tomorrow; a super slick and modern futurist science museum (as you could probably guess) exploring the Anthropocene and the profound effect of human civilisation’s presence on earth over the past century. Its exterior is one to be seriously impressed by, the architects having modelled its pristine white shell on the skeleton of a whale. Breakfast: orange cake and a much needed coffee. Its interior was no less impressive, being composed of large bright white expanses, undulating curves and organic shapes, all being filled with natural light. The exhibitions were impressively immersive and interactive, visitors becoming unquestionably enthralled in thought provoking games, interactive displays, 15 foot high panels of film, and stunning interior structures, art and installations illuminated with coloured lights. You leave the museum intrigued and inspired, or like me in a state of awe at the entirety of the stunning experience.

Real Rio Nights

Nightlife in Rio is as vibrant as expected, but watch out when in very busy or very quiet areas – hold onto your purses ladies. And use caution when whipping out flashy camera equipment, phones or other tech. I’ve not had the misfortune of being separated from my devices in such a way, but not many people have a Brazilian telling you angrily 109349 times a day to put your phone back in your bag – good intentions I’m sure, no hard feelings…   If without a car your nightlife should be well planned, as we discovered this night; after an interesting trip to CCBB – Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil (a cultural centre with art, theatre and more) – to see some weird sound art and German photography, Feira de São Cristovão was our next stop – a famous night market filled with souvenir, amenity and food stalls and many restaurants. The market is notorious for its Northeastern Brazilian goods, unhelpful for exploring Southern culture but nice nonetheless. After an intense restaurant war, being …

Paleta Festa

Paletas Mexicanas strikes again, but with less gusto than that of the one I devoured in Recife; I have now commenced my search for the best Ninho Trufado lolly. A creamy condensed milk outer with chocolatey fudge inner. Just down the road from my airbnb was an array of organic markets, papelerias (stationery stores), bakeries and a Paletas Mexicanas store. Although not quite the standard of the Recife lolly, it served as a good brunch-time snack en route to Praia do Flamengo – another beautiful beach on the coast of Rio: super quiet, bright white sand and clear cool water. For lunch we took a trip to Senador Camará, a neighbourhood an hours train ride away from the centre of the capital, but still in Rio – it’s a seriously big place. A poor community in the middle of the mountains, Senador Camará is where some family of my Pedro (my man) lives. So clearly we had to take a trip to meet the family, experience local non-tourist life and of course traditional food; to …

Four Fantastic Fruits From Afar

When in another country you always expect to be surrounded by new local cuisines and dishes, but in Brazil when it came to simply fruits I discovered a whole new array of tropical tastes that blew my British socks off; I figured I was pretty familiar with most of the fruits the world had to offer, but to find such a new variety was naively unexpected… 1 | Pinha (Peen-yah) My first experience and realisation that there was more to the fruit world than that Sainsbury’s could offer was with a Pinha; a tennis ball sized fruit with a crusty, thick scale-like skin. Each scale has one tiny piece of edible fruit with a big fleshy seed in the centre. The meat is white, super sweet and smooth – think grape-like but with more fibre and chew. If you get one ripe enough, the meat will melt in your mouth and the skin and flesh will crumble in your hungry hands.The juice is also delightfully refreshing on a hot (standard) day in the North-East coast …

Antigo Meets Novo

Brazil’s former Dutch colonisation way back in the 1600’s has left modern day Brazil’s urban landscape speckled with beautifully coloured and colonial buildings. Visiting Recife Antigo, Old Recife, the Dutch influence is clear. Narrow roads lined with coloured apartments are vibrant and full of history, larger buildings with more prowess inhabiting many a modern day art gallery, restaurant and artisanal gift selection. In Recife Antigo you can find Marco Zero; literally 0 mark, it marks the beginning for measuring roads in the city and is the place where the Portuguese founded Recife in 1537. What was once a quiet, fairly deserted open area has now been transformed into a bustling hotspot for Recife, where one can experience weekly markets , performances and events alongside new more commercial surrounding developments, featuring artisanal arts and crafts and a variety of cafes and restaurants. The 0 mark itself. Located on the Island of Recife, near the Recife harbor, you can take a boat trip from a willing local on Rio Capibaribe for only a few Reais and sail to Parque das Esculturas …

England Meets Recife

Brazil is incredibly green. That may sound weird and it feels weird to say but the vibrant green terrain, and sheer amount of greenery and various interesting looking trees and shrubs is amazing. Even in the city, paralleling kilometres of road are fantastic billowing trees. Recife’s skyline was also rather a perplexing sight; a crowd of skyscrapers, all pretty much identical in design rise up in the centre of the city, surrounded by extremely poor communities – terracotta coloured flat roofed shacks, unmaintained, rickety and decrepit. The city however is named as the Venice of Brazil, filled with rivers and pools of water, sitting on the North East coast of Brazil. The beaches: beautiful! Warm as my tea back home, the water is like a Sunday night bath, the air warm and the breeze cool. After my flight we headed to a little place serving local food; Caldinho – broths of all sorts, made from various ingredients but mainly beans; an (extremely large) stuffed fish with vegetables, Farofa (dried crunchy cassava) cooked with butter, eggs …